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Can you call us "differently-abled" or just disabled? Disability is perceived to be a sensitive topic by many.

Disabled-the population is anxious over saying the wrong things out of ignorance. This silence leads to avoidance of having important conversations about disability.  There needs to be sensitivity to this.

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There have been various debates over the legitimacy of this campaign between several parties. One half sees the need to correctly label people as disabled and allow them to have power over their limitations.

In the end, not be defined by it. To create the label "differently-abled" is to diminish the political positioning of disability. It is trying to assure disabled people that we are able bodies just different.

The campaign preaches that they are not devaluing their experiences. They are sympathizing with them in their struggles.

The idea of using the term "differently-abled" gives more power to the affected people. Its a softer approach. It is better this way.

Disabled people or differently-abled people are like able-bodied people in that they are human beings.

And they carry the same diversity as non-disabled people.

However, people look different because of their height, built, eye color, along with differences in needing wheelchairs, a hearing loop, or a career.

Moreover, disabled people do not have a world that is set up for them. It is really not in their favor.

Furthermore, especially if we know the impact would be far greater.

They have to strive for easy accessibility and inclusion to be on the same footing as regular people. A fight that regular people struggle to understand no matter how empathetic.

Guidelines for having conversations with or about "disabled" or "differently-abled" people

We encourage our readers to educate themselves on these matters. Use appropriate dialogue with "disabled people.” We've listed some ideas that will help have a better result.

1. Listen to the people of discussion. They should be in charge of how they want to label themselves.

2. Disabled people do not consider disability as part of their persona and often do not identify with being called a "person with a disability.”

3. Avoid unnecessary emotional tones. Having a disability doesn't make someone a victim, a burden, or a hero.

4. Avoid the word 'handicap.’ The word handicap is viewed as having a negative meaning.

5. Avoid calling a disabled person a 'patient' People with disabilities.

6. Do not refer to a person's disability as part of their identity.

Allow people the choice to label or not label themselves.

We should campaign to advocate the "people-first" language, which emphasizes putting the person first and the disability second.

After years of experiencing "neutral," clinical terms like "mentally defective" or "afflicted," person-first language was a method to reclaim humanity and personhood, according to Lydia X. Z. Brown is a disability justice community leader and lawyer.

Today, the loudest campaigners of person-first language are non-disabled people. Parents of disabled children, teachers, and medical practitioners who may have been taught to "treat the patient, not the disease."

It's important to know that the disability community is not a monolith. A person might have a preference that differs from other populations in their community. If you're wondering what's the best way to identify friends, co-workers, or others, all it takes is a willingness to follow their lead.

First, take your cues on how people refer to themselves in a group setting.

In addition, when in doubt, call someone by their name ― or simply ask how they would like to be addressed in a tactful, non-awkward way. 

Words have a lot of power.

Furthermore, labels that we put on people have even more so.

How we talk about people paves the way on how they perceive themselves? It has a lasting impact on how they see the world. Labeling someone as “dis-abled” makes them believe as if they are not qualified for tasks. “Differently-abled” allows them to know that the world works differently for them. And they have unique abilities that need time. Maybe even the will power to flourish.

Conclusion

Words have a lot of power. Labels that we put on people make a difference. How we talk about people paves the way on how they perceive themselves and has a lasting impact on how they see the world. Labeling someone as “dis-abled” makes them believe as if they are not qualified for tasks. “Differently-abled” allows them to know that the world works differently for them and that they have unique abilities that need time and willpower to flourish.






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